Florida Fracas

An unfortunate, but unsurprising fight has broken out between GOP primary candidates Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio. Cruz is bashing Rubio over the Sunshine State.  Pundits can’t decide whether the Texas senator covets Florida’s 99 delegates or is so desperate to get Rubio off the ballot that he’s willing to put himself 99 delegates behind in order to achieve this goal.  Or is it Trump who’s goading Rubio one way or the other.

 

A New York State court just dismissed a ballot challenge to keep Cruz off the New York primary ballot. He’s still struggling to get himself onto the New Jersey ballot.  I just received an e-mail listing several petition-signing rallies to put him on the ballot.

 

That’s Donald Trump playing dirty. Yet Cruz wants to go mano a mano with this scorpion in the Florida debate, leading up to the state’s primary on March 15 (the Ides of March).

 

Some of us have urged that Cruz and Rubio work together. Rubio is willing, but Cruz is stubbornly adamant that he will not cooperate with anyone, least of all Rubio, who erred in joining the Senate Gang of Eight in passing (or trying to pass?) the Amnesty Bill.

 

Cruz has benefitted by Saturday and closed primaries Cruz. But the bashing he and Rubio have given Trump diminished the neon sign god’s lead to 3 percent or less in Virginia (Rubio) and other states (Cruz and Kacich).  Some of the gilded paint is flaking off.  That is where they need to work together – during the debates.  On the campaign trail, they need to focus on Trump not one another.

 

Trump is anxious for Rubio to decamp, calling upon him condescendingly to leave the race. Cruz frets angrily, claiming that Rubio cost him the victories in Kentucky and Louisiana.  Apparently it hasn’t occurred to Cruz that spending time at CPAC speechifying and probably taking selfies with donors, while Trump cancelled his CPAC engagement and got right back on the campaign trail, is what cost him votes, not someone far behind in third place.

 

Cruz is my candidate and I regret finding myself in such a critical position towards my own candidate. Some accuse some phantom menace of interfering with Cruz’ campaign.  That would be risible if it were true.  Cruz pays other people to run his campaign, so who is this ‘phantom menace’ really interfering with:  Cruz or his campaign manager?  They can’t be doing a very good job if they think the enemy is someone in third place rather than the front-runner.

 

If only Rubio would defer to Cruz, Cruz could challenge the front-runner. However, the front-runner has been running a secondary campaign to keep Cruz, whom he accuses of not being a legal United States citizen, from getting on the ballot.  In New Jersey, something of a second home to Trump (with its governor as his ally), he may prevail. The ballot positions have still not been determined and June 9 is still months away.

 

But Christie has endorsed Trump. The governor is an enormous obstacle both physically and politically. It’s not inconceivable that Christie would wield his influence over the court to keep Cruz off the ballot.

 

If Cruz can’t get on the ballot and he succeeds in pressuring Rubio off the ballot, that only leaves New Jerseyans with a choice of Kacich or Trump, and New Jersey is already stuffed to the rafters with Trumpsters, even some Parties. Presently, Kacich barely registers on the delegate Richter scale and he already has his own ideas of a brokered convention.

 

Mind you, brokered, not contested. A brokered convention effectively shuts out the voters altogether.  Experts say that brokered or contested convention would put the decision back in the hands of the Republican Party, something we certainly don’t want.

 

That’s the very sort of politics that most infuriates the average American – being shut out. Having the door closed on them.  It’s political bullying.  Political bullying and manipulation has given us a rollover Congress filled with RINO Republicans (including, I’m sorry to say, Rubio) who have no problem with an insurgency of Latino, South American voters crossing over our border.

 

South America has had a long history of one dictator after another making empty promises to the poor. That’s all they know.  No, of course, we can’t paint every Hispanic with that same brush.  But be assured, most of them do think that way.  The same Hispanic voters who are crossing into Republican territory thanks to open primaries, will flood back over to the Democrat side once they’ve finished shredding the GOP to pieces.

 

Rubio was wrong to join the Gang of Eight. He alienated his Florida constituency (and central Florida is said to be heavily Hispanic, living off of minimum wages in Theme Park Country, while the wealthy frequent Mar-a-Lago, Trump’s pricey South Florida restaurant).  He’ll have a difficult time winning the Conservatives back and so he will have to rely on the Hispanic vote.

 

Still, Rubio underwent an unfair thrashing at the hands of Trump’s henchman, N.J. Gov. Chris Christie. All because he dared to criticize Christie’s former BF, Obama.  Rubio was right, but no matter how many times he tried to repeat, all viewers heard was Christie’s mocking.

 

Rubio was trying to warn us about the dangers of tyranny. To be fair, so is Ted Cruz, who is probably the staunchest advocate ever of the U.S. Constitution.  In the battle, Cruz took the bookish high road, while Rubio took the lower, thankless road.  He kept Trump the Terrible off-balance until Cruz could deliver the higher-minded blow.

 

Rubio had to take a lot of heat for what were essentially schoolyard tactics, tactics that began with Trump, not Rubio. As Rubio tried to point out, he was only giving Trump a taste of his own medicine.  What he got for his trouble was flack from the paternal, authoritarian Media who enjoyed wagging their finger at him, while the bigger, older Trump was given a clear pass.

 

Schoolyard tactics are important to note. Tyranny begins in the schoolyard as bullying.  It’s the larger bully who targets the loner, the outcast kid, the one all the other kids shun.  Instead of defending the individual kid, they join in with the popular bully.  Yes, the bully is a popular, if dreaded, figure.  Who wants to be on the receiving end of that fist or that cringe-worthy taunt?

 

School authorities and parents look the other way. The younger child at home isn’t protected.  If they fight back, they’re scolded.  At school, they’re told it’s wrong to fight back.  If they do, they’re attempt to defend themselves is met with scorn and derision by those other kids.  Bully 1, victim, 0.  Kids are taught it’s not only wrong, but foolish, to take on someone bigger or meaner than themselves.

 

They go onto high school, where the bullies form themselves into violent gangs or vicious cliques, usually, of girls. Now the victim is not just faced with one person bigger than themselves, but a group of people all in solidarity against the lone individual.  The victims typically get stuffed into lockers, beaten up after school, mocked, and in this age of computerized cruelty, are attacked on social media.

 

Still, no one comes to the aid of the individual. They’re told it’s just part of growing up, part of going to school, part of life.  Get used to it.  Buck up or get beaten up.  The result is that young girls hang themselves in closets and masculinely or athletically insufficient boys jump off of bridges.

 

After high school graduation, both types go on either to work or to college. At work, the bullies now form themselves into unions to strong-arm the management (and sometimes, management has it coming in.  Not over pay, but over abuse.).  At college, future business managers learn the fine art of bullying employees.

 

Once out in the world, the bosses, the managers fortify themselves with caffeine, and often “performance-enhancing” drugs and proceed to keel-haul their unfortunate underlings. These verbally-abusive monsters scream at workers, kicking cabinets and slamming doors, until their workers are forced themselves to resort to taking anti-anxiety medications.  While the managers are buffing themselves up at the gym, their employees are on the therapists couch trying to figure out where they went wrong.

 

That’s just the business as usual. The college graduates who didn’t go into business go into public service as government regulators, lawyers and inspectors.  They’re unelected and unaccountable.  They’re the relics of several administrations past who cannot be removed under any law in the U.S. Code of Laws.

 

Businesses and citizens pay the price in onerous regulations and fees. Have you looked at your telephone or other utility bill lately?  They have jobs for life and thanks to Obamacare, jobs for life or death over the rest of us.  Take a good look at the scaffolding on the U.S. Capitol (I know I’ve written about this before but a reminder never hurts); that’s your government at work.

 

The lessons we all learned on the playground in kindergarten follow us right to city hall, as in don’t fight it. Americans have learned this lesson so well that they don’t bother to show up to off-year primaries at all (a pitiful 25 percent in New Jersey), procrastinate during Congressional and Senatorial elections, and hem and haw even at having to go to presidential primaries, where they’ve learned their vote doesn’t count much because the candidates bully each other into wrapping things up early, before even half of the country (New Jersey’s at the bottom of this list) have had a chance to make their preference known.

 

All our community decisions on housing, zoning, education, health care have been taken to new levels of government intrusion. We’re the children back on the playground who are told we should let the “adults” make the decisions and talk back to them.  We’re Marco Rubio on the debate stage, talking back to The Donald.  “The” Donald, you will note.

 

Obediently, we go back to playing house, playing with our electronics, and struggling with our jobs and mortgage payments while a patrician government spends our economic future away and strips us of our various civil rights, an argument Ted Cruz makes with authority and knowledge.

 

Weakening us domestically is not enough for the future tyrants, however. In diminish our military and our foreign policy, Obama has left America vulnerable to radical enemies who have no civilized rulebook at all.  Anything and everything will work for them if it achieves their goal of global dominance.  Hence, the argument for a “strongman” like Trump, that very same former schoolyard bully who had the audacity to refer to his manhood on national television.

 

There’s a man for you. That’s what used to be boasted of such “men.”  The middle finger blue-collar, Middle and Lower Class America has been waiting for.  If only that ridiculous Marco Rubio would get out of the way.

 

Indeed, he was a member of the “Gang of Eight.” In retrospect, isn’t that a rather disturbing noun to be using to describe a group of United States Senators?  A “Gang”?  A gang that wants to unleash the hordes of Latin Americans onto an American public with which they will refuse to assimilate?  Rubio needs to have his Gang of Eight tattoo removed.

 

That was two or three years ago. Rubio has since been verbally smacked around by Donald Trump, demonstrating to one and all just what a bully can achieve if given the chance and if the parental authorities of the Media tie Rubio’s hands.  If he didn’t know what it feels like to be one the “little people,” he does now.

 

Trump and Cruz want to go at in the Florida debate. Rubio shouldn’t bow out of the race just because Cruz doesn’t like competition and let down his supporters.  But in the debate, he should let them go at one another.  He shouldn’t keep Trump busy.  If Trump criticizes him, he should ignore him.  Better yet, point in Cruz’s direction and tell him that Cruz is over there; he’s the candidate Trump wanted to mangle – so go for it.  Rubio and Kacich can just stand by and watch.

 

Either Cruz will prove his mettle, thus earning the nomination. Or Trump will give him a professional, verbal wrestling match going-over.

 

And it will serve Cruz right.

 

This post has reading level of Grade 8.8. Will we ever make to high school?!  Stay tuned!
 

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Published in: on March 7, 2016 at 9:13 pm  Leave a Comment  

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